You needn’t fret about USB Type C connector design

Not too long ago, took a big step forward in helping engineers involved in design. The company released its Method of Implementation (MoI) document for cable and connector assembly compliance testing (for Rev. 1.1 of the spec). In a nutshell, when combined with the appropriate test package (like Keysight’s state file), the MoI can operate in a ’s enhanced time domain to provide the compliance test solution for USB Type-C cable and connector assemblies. This step-by-step guide of measurement procedures for time and frequency domains simplifies USB Type-C cable-connector compliance setup and testing. As part of Keysight’s Type-C total solution set, its ENA-TDR analyzer is ready for complete testing of the standards converging on this universal interface.

The smaller Type-C connector, with its’ 24-pins and a symmetric form factor, lets users plug it in either way. The smaller connector results in tougher requirements for the physical layer to ensure interoperability. It’s robust enough for high-speed applications, yet small enough for personal consumer devices. Note that it also can provide up to 100 W of power. And by providing bi-directional power, a peripheral device can charge a host.

The USB Type-C connector can create transmitter test challenges. By adding power delivery and ALT mode, host and device link negotiation, testing, and compliance are needed for power management, ALT mode, and USB compliance test requirements.

KeysightsE5071C ENA-TDR is an application embedded in the network analyzer that provides a one-box solution for high-speed serial interconnect analysis. The software offers simple and intuitive operation; fast and accurate measurements simultaneously in the time (TDR/TDT) and frequency domains (S-parameter); and ESD robustness for reduction of maintenance cost.

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